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Children in Medical ResearchAccess versus Protection$
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Lainie Friedman Ross

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780199273287

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2006

DOI: 10.1093/0199273286.001.0001

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Minimizing Risks: Diabetes Research in Newborns

Minimizing Risks: Diabetes Research in Newborns

Chapter:
(p.171) 10 Minimizing Risks: Diabetes Research in Newborns
Source:
Children in Medical Research
Author(s):

Lainie Friedman Ross (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0199273286.003.0011

This chapter examines the meta-ethical question regarding subject selection in newborn screening for diabetes. Data show that over 90% of parents give permission for diabetes screening of their newborns in the US and abroad. It is argued that prediction research in newborns has potentially serious psychosocial implications, especially when it is introduced into the unsuspecting general population, and research designs must account for them. Recommendations are proposed that balance the need for research access with protection, to minimize harm to infants and their families.

Keywords:   diabetes research, pediatric research, newborns, diabetes prediction, subject selection, risk

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