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Reforming European Welfare StatesGermany and the United Kingdom Compared$
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Jochen Clasen

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780199270712

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2006

DOI: 10.1093/0199270716.001.0001

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Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) 1 Introduction
Source:
Reforming European Welfare States
Author(s):

Jochen Clasen (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0199270716.003.0001

This introductory chapter reflects on the need for in-depth historically sensitive research on the development of advanced welfare states. Contrasting the diverging trends and social and economic fortunes in the UK and Germany since the late 1970s, it argues that the two countries have all but undergone a role reversal in terms of their efficiency and sustainability as models of modern social capitalism. The chapter introduces the aims of the book, i.e. empirical investigation into, and causes for, the development of three major social policy domains in the two countries over the past 25 years or so. In order to comprehend similarities and diverging trends, multi-causal accounts at programme level are required.

Keywords:   Germany, UK, socio-economic change, welfare state restructuring, retrenchment, social policy reform

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