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International Society and its Critics$
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Alex J. Bellamy

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780199265206

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2005

DOI: 10.1093/0199265208.001.0001

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International Political Economy and Globalization

International Political Economy and Globalization

Chapter:
(p.115) 6 International Political Economy and Globalization
Source:
International Society and its Critics
Author(s):

Barry Buzan

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0199265208.003.0007

Deals with arguably the most pointed omission from the thinking of the English School of International Relations – international political economy (IPE) – a failure has had serious and negative consequences for how the understanding of international society has developed, and has also had the consequence that the English School has so far not exploited its considerable potential to act as the theoretical framework through which globalization can be analyzed. The author holds that nothing stands in the way of bringing IPE into the international society tradition, and that much is to be gained by doing so. In the first section of the chapter, he begins his account by identifying and then accounting for this omission, arguing that it is both unnecessary and unjustified; he places the economic sector within English School thinking, looks at what has been said about it, and examines why it has been neglected. In the second section, the consequences of the neglect of the economic sector are explored for the debate about pluralism and solidarism. In the third section, regions and institutions are examined as ways of bringing IPE and the English School together, and in the final section, it is argued that this combination holds the key to a more effective study of globalization.

Keywords:   English School of International Relations, globalization, institutions, international political economy, international relations, international society, pluralism, regions

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