Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
State of the Union$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Iain McLean and Alistair McMillan

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780199258208

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2006

DOI: 10.1093/0199258201.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 25 February 2018

Public Finance in an Asymmetric Union

Public Finance in an Asymmetric Union

Chapter:
(p.221) 10 Public Finance in an Asymmetric Union
Source:
State of the Union
Author(s):

Iain Mclean

Alistair McMillan (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0199258201.003.0010

In both the 1707 and 1800 Unions, a poor country was joined to a rich one, therefore the tax potential per head in the expanded Union declined. However, until the 1880s, governments spent money mostly on public goods, which did not raise the issue that taxes were raised in rich areas and spent in poor ones. Distributive politics of this sort began when governments started to spend money on schools and crofters — the 1870s and 1880s. The first public spending formula for the territories is due to Chancellor George Goschen in 1888. The formula that is current (although under great strain) was devised by Chief Secretary Joel Barnett and his officials in 1978.

Keywords:   public finance, public goods, Goschen Proportion, formula funding, block grant, needs assessment, Barnett Formula

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .