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Weakness of Will and Practical Irrationality$
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Sarah Stroud and Christine Tappolet

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9780199257362

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2005

DOI: 10.1093/0199257361.001.0001

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Paradoxical Emotion: On Sui Generis Emotional Irrationality

Paradoxical Emotion: On Sui Generis Emotional Irrationality

Chapter:
(p.274) 11 Paradoxical Emotion: On Sui Generis Emotional Irrationality
Source:
Weakness of Will and Practical Irrationality
Author(s):

Ronald de Sousa

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0199257361.003.0012

Weakness of will violates practical rationality; but may also be viewed as an epistemic failing. Conflicts between strategic and epistemic rationality suggest that we need a superordinate standard to arbitrate between them. Contends that such a standard is to be found at the axiological level, apprehended by emotions. Axiological rationality is sui generis, reducible to neither the strategic nor the epistemic. But, emotions are themselves capable of raising paradoxes and antinomies, particularly when the principles they embody involve temporality. They constitute an ultimate court of appeal, yet their biological origin allows little hope that these antinomies can be resolved.

Keywords:   akrasia, antinomies, appropriateness, axiology, emotional rationality, emotions, practical reasoning, rationality, temporality, weakness of will

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