Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Parties Without Partisans
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Parties Without Partisans: Political Change in Advanced Industrial Democracies

Russell J. Dalton and Martin P. Wattenberg

Abstract

This is a broad cross‐national study of the role of political parties in contemporary democracies. Leading scholars in the field assess the evidence for partisan decline or adaptation for 20 OECD nations. This book documents the broadscale erosion of the public's partisan identities in virtually all advanced industrial democracies. It demonstrates how political parties have adapted to partisan dealignment by strengthening their internal organizational structures and partially isolating themselves from the ebbs and flows of electoral politics. Centralized, professionalized parties with short t ... More

Keywords: organizations

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2002 Print ISBN-13: 9780199253098
Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2003 DOI:10.1093/0199253099.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Russell J. Dalton, editor
Department of Political Science, University of California, Irvine,
Author Webpage

Martin P. Wattenberg, author
Department of Political Science, University of California, Irvine,
Author Webpage

Contents

View:

Introduction

1 Unthinkbale Democracy

Russell J. Dalton and Martin P. Wattenberg

Part I Parties in the Electorate

3 The Consequences of Partisan Dealignment

Russell J. Dalton, Ian McAllister and Martin P. Wattenberg

Part II Parties as Political Organizations

5 Parties Without Members?

Susan E. Scarrow

6 Political Parties as Campaign Organizations

David M. Farrell and Paul Webb

7 From Social Integration to Electoral Contestation

Susan E. Scarrow, Paul Webb, and David M. Farrell

Part III Parties in Government

10 From Platform Declarations to Policy Outcomes

Miki L. Caul and Mark M. Gray

Conclusion

12 Partisan Change and the Democratic Process

Russell J. Dalton and Martin P. Wattenberg

End Matter