Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Minority Nationalism and the Changing International Order$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Michael Keating and John McGarry

Print publication date: 2001

Print ISBN-13: 9780199242146

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2003

DOI: 10.1093/0199242143.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 09 December 2018

Nationalism in Transition: Nationalizing Impulses and International Counterweights in Latvia and Estonia

Nationalism in Transition: Nationalizing Impulses and International Counterweights in Latvia and Estonia

Chapter:
(p.342) Chapter 16 Nationalism in Transition: Nationalizing Impulses and International Counterweights in Latvia and Estonia
Source:
Minority Nationalism and the Changing International Order
Author(s):

Julie Bernier

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0199242143.003.0016

Nationalizing impulses in countries with substantial ethnic minorities often provoke counter‐mobilization by those minorities. This chapter looks at the effectiveness of international organizations in providing a counterweight to these impulses, with particular reference to the cases of Latvia and Estonia. It is divided into two main sections. The first shows that the adoption of nationalizing measures in Latvia and Estonia is rooted in concerns about the identity, demography, and social mobility of the core group, and outlines the types of nationalizing strategies that have been adopted to reallocate power, status, and resources in favour of this group. The second section examines interventions in Latvia and Estonia by the OSCE (Organization for Security and Co‐operation in Europe) High Commissioner on National Minorities, the Council of Europe, and the EU. Argues that the combination of these pressures has made an important contribution to the recent relaxation of the nationalizing policies that these two countries adopted in their first years of independence.

Keywords:   Council of Europe, Estonia, European Community, Latvia, nationalism, OSCE

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .