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Delegation and Accountability in Parliamentary Democracies$
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Kaare Strøm, Wolfgang C. Müller, and Torbjörn Bergman

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9780198297840

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2005

DOI: 10.1093/019829784X.001.0001

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Iceland: A Parliamentary Democracy with a Semi-presidential Constitutio n

Iceland: A Parliamentary Democracy with a Semi-presidential Constitutio n

Chapter:
(p.399) 12 Iceland: A Parliamentary Democracy with a Semi-presidential Constitution
Source:
Delegation and Accountability in Parliamentary Democracies
Author(s):

Svanur Kristjánsson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/019829784X.003.0012

Formerly, the principles of delegation and accountability were poorly developed within this system, because the logic of Iceland’s patronage system embedded political relationships in a social system of mutual exchange and favours. This has changed over time as society has become more pluralistic and corporatism, which allows interest groups to dominate decision-making in some areas, has developed. Open primaries have eliminated safe seats and have made individual MPs more directly accountable to voters. Open primaries limit party discipline with regard to electoral opportunities, but political parties still can exert control over individual MPs using campaign finance.

Keywords:   constitutional tradition, corporatism, European economic area (EEA) membership, interest groups, open primaries, party rule, patronage, proportional representation, referendums

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