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The End of Class Politics?Class Voting in Comparative Context$
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Geoffrey Evans

Print publication date: 1999

Print ISBN-13: 9780198296348

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2003

DOI: 10.1093/0198296347.001.0001

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4 Classes, Unions, and the Realignment of US Presidential Voting, 1952–1992

4 Classes, Unions, and the Realignment of US Presidential Voting, 1952–1992

Chapter:
(p.83) 4 Classes, Unions, and the Realignment of US Presidential Voting, 1952–1992
Source:
The End of Class Politics?
Author(s):

Michael Hout

Jeff Manza (Contributor Webpage)

Clem Brooks

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0198296347.003.0004

Class voting in US presidential elections underwent a historic realignment (rather than dealignment) during the 1960s and 1970s. The middle class split their allegiance: professionals and routine white‐collar workers switched from supporting Republican candidates to backing the Democrats, while the self‐employed converted from fence‐sitting to strong Republican support. At the same time, the Democrats lost their former blue‐collar base. This chapter investigates the role of the demise of the trade unions during the realignment of class voting in the US. It concludes that the drop in union membership hurt Democratic candidates, but it does not explain the realignment of class voting in US presidential elections.

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