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A Not-so-dismal ScienceA Broader View of Economies and Societies$
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Mancur Olson and Satu Kähköhnen

Print publication date: 2000

Print ISBN-13: 9780198294900

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2003

DOI: 10.1093/0198294905.001.0001

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Affirmative Action and Reservations in the American and Indian Labor Markets: Are They Really That Bad?

Affirmative Action and Reservations in the American and Indian Labor Markets: Are They Really That Bad?

Chapter:
(p.182) 7 Affirmative Action and Reservations in the American and Indian Labor Markets: Are They Really That Bad?
Source:
A Not-so-dismal Science
Author(s):

Edward Montgomery

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0198294905.003.0008

The theoretical and empirical evidence of the economic effects of affirmative action or quota (positive discrimination) programmes for minority racial groups in the USA, and of reservations of government jobs for scheduled castes and tribes in India, are compared and discussed. The focus is on the effects on wages and employment in the labour market as well as on the acquisition of skills. Consideration is also given to how the dynamics of collective action may turn these programmes, which were designed to be temporary and limited in scope, into larger, more permanent ones.

Keywords:   affirmative action, caste, employment, India, job reservation, labour market, minority groups, positive discrimination, quotas, scheduled castes, skill acquisition, tribes, USA, wages

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