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Poverty and UndernutritionTheory, Measurement, and Policy$
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Peter Svedberg

Print publication date: 2000

Print ISBN-13: 9780198292685

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2003

DOI: 10.1093/0198292686.001.0001

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Calorie Intake and Distribution: Estimates from the Consumption Side

Calorie Intake and Distribution: Estimates from the Consumption Side

Chapter:
(p.96) 7 Calorie Intake and Distribution: Estimates from the Consumption Side
Source:
Poverty and Undernutrition
Author(s):

Peter Svedberg (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0198292686.003.0007

Given the importance of national per‐capita calorie availability in the FAO estimations of undernutrition, this chapter takes a second look at this parameter; now from the consumption side. Estimates of per‐capita calorie consumption from various food and expenditure surveys in several countries are compared with corresponding supply‐side estimates derived by the FAO, and huge mismatches are found. The main methodological flaws in most food consumption surveys from developing countries are identified and the conclusion is that these surveys are, with notably few exceptions, as unreliable as the FAO's food balance sheet estimates. It is also found that the estimates of the distribution of available calories across households, one of the three key parameters in the FAO model, are highly unreliable and in no single case, nationally representative. The evidence on peoples’ actual calorie expenditures by the only reliable method there—the Doubly Labelled Water Method—is unfortunately far too scant to permit any generalizations whatsoever.

Keywords:   calorie consumption, calorie expenditure, Doubly Labelled Water Method, expenditure surveys, FAO

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