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Challenge to the Nation-StateImmigration in Western Europe and the United States$
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Christian Joppke

Print publication date: 1998

Print ISBN-13: 9780198292296

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2003

DOI: 10.1093/0198292295.001.0001

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Asylum and State Sovereignty: A Comparison of the United States, Germany, and Britain

Asylum and State Sovereignty: A Comparison of the United States, Germany, and Britain

Chapter:
(p.109) 4 Asylum and State Sovereignty: A Comparison of the United States, Germany, and Britain
Source:
Challenge to the Nation-State
Author(s):

Christian Joppke

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0198292295.003.0005

This chapter analyses two claims on the capacity of states to control immigration: that this capacity is declining, and that this decline is related to the rise of an international human rights regime that restricts the ability of states to determine the entry and exit of migrants. The asylum policies of three major countries are studied: United States, Germany, and Britain. It is argued that asylum policy is conditioned by the dual and increasingly opposite nation-state principles of human rights protection and popular sovereignty; the strength of both varying with time and place.

Keywords:   asylum policy, sovereignty, immigration policy, human rights, Britain, Germany, United States, nation-state

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