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Biblical Interpretation in Ancient Israel$
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Michael Fishbane

Print publication date: 1988

Print ISBN-13: 9780198266990

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2003

DOI: 10.1093/0198266995.001.0001

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Conclusions

Conclusions

Chapter:
(p.408) 14 Conclusions
Source:
Biblical Interpretation in Ancient Israel
Author(s):

Michael Fishbane (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0198266995.003.0015

Provides a wide‐ranging conclusion to this part. It considers the various genres and types of inner‐biblical aggadic exegesis; the dynamics and implications of traditum and traditio involved; and the methods and modalities of cultural retrieval and transformation. Of particular note is the emergence of a ‘canonical consciousness’, whereby topics of various sorts from various genres are taken up and revised by later teachers and tridents: A new sense of the pastness of the past; of the reuse of the past for analogies and correlations; and the transformations in the meaning of Torah. A classification of aggadic form, technique, and logic are provided, giving insight into the emergent exegetical mind of ancient Israelite culture; similarly, there is an extended treatment of the types of rhetorical treatment involved, giving insight into types of spiritualization and nomicization of content. The ‘voice’ of instruction is considered (direct, personal, pseudepigraphic), as well as the cultural implications (and anticipations of early Jewish aggadic exegesis).

Keywords:   aggadic logic, aggadic technique, exegetical forms, pseudepigraphy, revelation, rhetoric, theological transformation, tradition, typology

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