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Time, Tense, and Causation$
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Michael Tooley

Print publication date: 2000

Print ISBN-13: 9780198250746

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2003

DOI: 10.1093/0198250746.001.0001

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The Special Theory of Relativity and the Unreality of the Future

The Special Theory of Relativity and the Unreality of the Future

Chapter:
(p.335) 11 The Special Theory of Relativity and the Unreality of the Future
Source:
Time, Tense, and Causation
Author(s):

Michael Tooley (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0198250746.003.0012

According to the Special Theory of Relativity, there is no such thing as absolute simultaneity, contrary to the view defended in the book. However, this chapter demonstrates that the Special Theory of Relativity can be modified so as to allow absolute simultaneity. This modification involves reference to absolute space and the causal relations between space‐time points, and drops the assumption that the one‐way speed of light is constant through all frames of reference. Contrary to the orthodox theory, the modified version has the additional advantage of avoiding a clash with quantum mechanics, such as brought out by the Einstein‐Podolsky‐Rosen thought experiment and Bell's Theorem.

Keywords:   absolute simultaneity, absolute space, Bell's Theorem, Einstein‐Podolsky‐Rosen thought experiment, frame of reference, quantum mechanics, Special Theory of Relativity, speed of light

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