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Self and World in Schopenhauer's Philosophy
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Self and World in Schopenhauer's Philosophy

Christopher Janaway

Abstract

Centres on Schopenhauer's conception of the self and how it relates to the world, primarily dealing with his book The World as Will and Representation. It locates Schopenhauer in relation to Kant, of whom he was both a follower and a critic. While accepting Kant's transcendental idealism and the associated notion of the ‘I’ as a pure subject of knowledge distinct from the world of objects, Schopenhauer undercuts this notion with a conception of the self as will. The self as will is primarily active, embodied, organic, and manifests pre‐rational ends and drives. The book shows how Schopenhauer ... More

Keywords: free will, idealism, Christopher Janaway, Kant, Nietzsche, Schopenhauer, self, thing in itself, will, Wittgenstein, world

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 1999 Print ISBN-13: 9780198250036
Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2003 DOI:10.1093/0198250037.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Christopher Janaway, author
Birkbeck College, University of London
Author Webpage