Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Imaginary Museum of Musical WorksAn Essay in the Philosophy of Music$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Lydia Goehr

Print publication date: 1994

Print ISBN-13: 9780198235415

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2003

DOI: 10.1093/0198235410.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 20 November 2018

After 1800: The Beethoven Paradigm

After 1800: The Beethoven Paradigm

Chapter:
(p.205) 8 After 1800: The Beethoven Paradigm
Source:
The Imaginary Museum of Musical Works
Author(s):

Lydia Goehr (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0198235410.003.0009

Investigates the transition to a musical practice in which the focus was on the production of complete, discrete, original, and fixed products. It explores the development and consequences of the emerging Beethoven myth and with this the Beethoven paradigm, according to which Beethoven comes to be the standard for what it means to compose musical works. The paradigm is described according to several historical shifts in musical practice: the composers’ rising authority and social standing; the composer's increasing independence from worldly affairs; reconceived relations to publishers and performers as well as reconceived norms of ownership, copyright, and plagiarism; new discussions of fidelity, werktreue, and texttreue. The emerging cult of virtuosity and extemporization are also considered. The idea is simply to describe the work concept as thickly as possible, which means at every level of practice and theory.

Keywords:   Beethoven, copyright, fidelity, myth, originality, paradigm, plagiarism, virtuosity

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .