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Minds and GodsThe Cognitive Foundations of Religion$

Todd Tremlin

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780195305340

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2006

DOI: 10.1093/0195305345.001.0001

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(p.201) Bibliography

(p.201) Bibliography

Source:
Minds and Gods
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Oxford University Press

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