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The Ethics of Animal ExperimentationA Critical Analysis and Constructive Christian Proposal$
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Donna Yarri

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780195181791

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: July 2005

DOI: 10.1093/0195181794.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.155) Conclusion
Source:
The Ethics of Animal Experimentation
Author(s):

Donna Yarri (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0195181794.003.0008

The ultimate goal in animal experimentation is not necessarily to eliminate all experiments, but rather to establish a benign ethic for its practice. An interim ethic is described, which includes changes in current animal legislation, specifically with regard to the Animal Welfare Act. Paying attention to animal husbandry conditions and utilizing preference tests can go a long way in establishing a more humane practice of animal experimentation. Finally, the idea of pet keeping is offered as a model for treating experimental animals much as we would pets. The result would be a movement away from simply an instrumental and often harmful use of animals, to one which is based on the intrinsic value of animals.

Keywords:   animal experimentation, pet keeping, pets, animal legislation, Animal Welfare Act, animal husbandry, preference tests, interim ethic

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