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Race, Nation, and Religion in the Americas$
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Henry Goldschmidt and Elizabeth McAlister

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780195149180

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2005

DOI: 10.1093/0195149181.001.0001

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Race and Religion on the Periphery

Race and Religion on the Periphery

Disappointment and Missionization in the Spanish Floridas, 1566–1763

Chapter:
(p.35) 1 Race and Religion on the Periphery
Source:
Race, Nation, and Religion in the Americas
Author(s):

Daniel Murphree

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0195149181.003.0002

This chapter evaluates the process by which Spanish missionaries racialized Native Americans in the colonial Floridas between 1566 and 1763. During this period, Europeans involved in Christianizing natives expanded an idiom of description initiated by earlier Spanish explorers in reaction to ongoing failures relating to conquest and settlement. Missionaries and other colonists used these descriptions to fashion a unique European Floridian identity in the region premised on distinction from indigenous peoples. The related processes of racialization and identity formation influenced intercultural relationships in the region into the modern era.

Keywords:   Spanish, Catholic, missionaries, Florida, colonial, Christianizing, conquest, settlement, colonists, identity, indigenous peoples, racialization, intercultural

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