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Spiritual, but not ReligiousUnderstanding Unchurched America$
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Robert C. Fuller

Print publication date: 2001

Print ISBN-13: 9780195146806

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2003

DOI: 10.1093/0195146808.001.0001

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Powers of the Hidden Self

Powers of the Hidden Self

Psychological Spirituality

Chapter:
(p.123) 5 Powers of the Hidden Self
Source:
Spiritual, but not Religious
Author(s):

Robert C. Fuller (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0195146808.003.0006

Popular psychology has emerged as one of the major sources of Americans’ self‐understanding. From Ralph Waldo Emerson's essay on “Self‐Reliance” to today, American reading audiences have turned to popular psychologies with the hope of learning how they might inwardly align themselves with the deepest energies of the universe. William James, Abraham Maslow, and Carl Rogers are but a few of the acclaimed academic psychologists who have nurtured this uniquely American form of “psychological spirituality.” As exemplified in the writings of Rev. Norman Vincent Peale, this psychological spirituality has also filtered into the vocabulary with which members of mainstream churches take their religious bearings on life.

Keywords:   James, Maslow, Peale, Popoual Psychology, popular psychology, psychological spirituality, Rogers

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