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Identifying the Image of GodRadical Christians and Nonviolent Power in the Antebellum United States$

Dan McKanan

Print publication date: 2002

Print ISBN-13: 9780195145328

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2003

DOI: 10.1093/0195145321.001.0001

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(p.257) Bibliography

(p.257) Bibliography

Source:
Identifying the Image of God
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

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