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Landscapes of the SoulThe Loss of Moral Meaning in American Life$

Douglas V. Porpora

Print publication date: 2001

Print ISBN-13: 9780195134919

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2003

DOI: 10.1093/0195134915.001.0001

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(p.313) Appendix B Tables

(p.313) Appendix B Tables

Source:
Landscapes of the Soul
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Table 4‐1. Religiosity and Reflection the Meaning of Life*

How Often Respondents Think About Meaning of Life

How Religious Respondents Are

Not Very

Somewhat

Very

Total

Rarely

15.3%

18.6%

13.2%

N = 46

Sometimes

76.3%

69.0%

52.9%

N = 178

Always

8.5%

12.4%

33.8%

N = 47

Total

100%

100%

100%

N = 271

N=59

N=123

N=68

χ2 = 19.948

α = .0005

(*) For results of multiple regression analysis, controlling for demographic variables, see Chapter Four, note 13, p. 327.

(p.314)

Table 4‐2. Religiosity and Attitude Toward Meaning of Life*

Respondents' Attitudes Toward the Meaning of Life

How Religious Respondents Are

Not Very

Somewhat

Very

N

No meaning or other attitude

27.2%

8.5%

10.5%

73

Don't know meaning

33.0%

27.4%

11.8%

161

Some sense of life's purpose

33.0%

46.2%

36.8%

242

Know the purpose of life

6.6%

14.2%

40.7%

117

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

Total N

152

281

121

593

χ2 = 84.8

α < .001

(*) For results of multiple regression analysis, controlling for demographic variables, Chapter Four, see note 14, p. 327.

Table 5‐1. Hero‐Identification and the Meaning of Life

a. Hero‐Identification and Reflection on the Meaning of Life.

How Often Respondents Think About Meaning of Life

Do Those Respondents Have Heroes?

No

Yes

Total Cases

Rarely/Never

63.0%

37.0%

46 (17%)

Sometimes

62.9%

37.1%

178 (66%)

Always

38.3%

61.7%

47 (17%)

Total Cases

160

111

271 (100%)

(p.315)

b. Hero‐Identification and Certainty About Meaning of Life.

Respondents' Certainty About the Meaning of Life

Do Those Respondents Have Heroes?

No

Yes

Total Cases

Don't know meaning of life

69.6%

30.4%

161 (27%)

Have some sense of life's purpose

57.9%

42.1%

242 (41%)

Know the purpose of life

44.5%

55.5%

117 (20%)

Life has no meaning/Have other attitude

57%

43% 

117 (12%)

Total Cases

247

346  

593 (100%)

Table 6‐1. Student Survey Results

Calling by Religiosity (N = 321)

How Religious Are You?*

Have a calling?

Very Religious

Somewhat Religious

Not very Religious

Not at all Religious

No

29%

61%

70%

59%

Yes

71%

39%

30%

41%

(*) α < .001

(p.316)

Table 6‐2. Student Survey Results

Percentages of Respondents With Callings by Measures of Philosophical Reflectiveness (N = 320)

How Often Do You Think About:

Always

Often

Rarely

The existence of God

61%

37%

34%**

How the universe came into being

73%

43%

27%*

What is the purpose of life

59%

38%

34%***

(*) α < .001

(**) α < .002

(***) α < .020

Table 6‐3. Who Is Most Likely to Have a Calling?* Stepwise Multiple Regression Analysis

Independent Variable

Final β

Cumulative R

Cumulative R2

Change in R2

Significance

Reflection

.217

.278

.077

NA

.014

about Meaning

of Life

Religion

.032

NA

NA

NA

.784

Service

Attendance

.162

NA

NA

NA

.143

Education

.078

NA

NA

NA

.489

Age

.064

NA

NA

NA

.566

Income

.012

NA

NA

NA

.889

Race

.188

NA

NA

NA

.091

(*) Calling defined here as “true calling,” a sense of calling combined with an ability to say to what specifically one is called.