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Without Benefit of ClergyWomen and the Pastoral Relationship in Nineteenth-Century American Culture
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Without Benefit of Clergy: Women and the Pastoral Relationship in Nineteenth-Century American Culture

Karin E. Gedge

Abstract

By examining a wide variety of public and private primary sources from northeastern, mid-Atlantic, and midwestern states, Gedge challenges an assumption prevalent in nineteenth-century culture as well as twentieth-century historiography: women and clergy formed a natural alliance, exercised a particular influence over each other, and enjoyed a close, even perilously intimate, relationship. Part I locates the perception of a dangerous pastoral relationship in the published accounts of European travelers and in pamphlets describing dozens of criminal, civil, and ecclesiastical trials of clergy a ... More

Keywords: nineteenth-century American culture, women, Protestant clergy, “feminization” of clergy, “professionalization” of clergy, pastoral theology, gender ideology, separate spheres, sexual misconduct, pastoral relationship

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2003 Print ISBN-13: 9780195130201
Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2005 DOI:10.1093/0195130200.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Karin E. Gedge, author
Westchester University
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