Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Mobilizing for PeaceConflict Resolution in Northern Ireland, South Africa, and Israel/Palestine$

Benjamin Gidron, Stanley N. Katz, and Yeheskel Hasenfeld

Print publication date: 2002

Print ISBN-13: 9780195125924

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2003

DOI: 10.1093/0195125924.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2016. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy). Subscriber: null; date: 08 December 2016

(p.269) Selected References

(p.269) Selected References

Source:
Mobilizing for Peace
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Bibliography references:

Acker, J. “Feminist Goals and Organizing Process.” In Feminist Organizations, ed. M. Feree and P. Y. Martin. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1995, pp. 137–144.

Blain, M. “Power and Practice in Peace Movement Discourse.” Research in Social Movements: Conflicts and Change 2 (1989): 197–218.

Brown, M., ed. The International Dimensions of Internal Conflict. Cambridge: MIT Press, 1996.

Cable, S. “Professionalization in Social Movement Organization: A Case Study of Pennsylvanians for Biblical Morality.” Sociological Focus 17 (1984): 287–304.

Carroll, W., and Ratner, R. S. “Master Framing and Cross‐Movement Networking in Contemporary Social Movements.” Sociological Quarterly 37 (1996): 601–625.

Chatfield, C. The American Peace Movement. New York: Twayne Publishers, 1991.

Chatfield, C. and van den Dungen, P. Peace Movements and Political Culture. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1989.

Cochrane, F. and Dunn, S. Final Country Report, Northern Ireland, 1998.

Cress, D. and Snow, D. “Mobilization at the Margins: Resources, Benefactors and the Viability of Homeless Social Movement Organizations.” American Sociological Review 61 (1996): 1089–1109.

Dalton, R. The Green Rainbow. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1994.

Downton, J. and Wehr, P. “Peace Movements: The Role of Commitment and Community in Sustaining Member Participation.” Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change 13 (1991): 113–134.

Edwards, B. and Marullo, S. “Organizational Mortality in a Declining Social Movement: Demise of Peace Movement Organizations in the End of the Cold War Era.” American Sociological Review 60 (1995): 908–927.

Elias, R. and Turpin, J. eds. Rethinking Peace. Boulder: Lynne Rienner Publishers, 1994.

Ennis, J. “Fields of Action: Structure in Movements' Tactical Repertoires.” Sociological Forum 2, no. 3 (1987): 520–533.

Feree, M. M. Controversy and Coalition: New Feminist Movement. New York: Maxwell Macmillan International, 1994.

(p.270) Gamson, W. The Strategy of Social Protest. Homewood, Ill.: Dorsey Press, 1975.

Giliomee, H. “Introduction.” In The Elusive Search for Peace, ed. H. Giliomee and J. Gagiano. South Africa: Oxford University Press, 1990.

Giugni, M., McAdam, D. and Tilly, C. From Contention to Democracy. Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 1998.

Hunt, S. and Benford, R. “Identity Talk in the Peace and Justice Movement.” Journal of Contemporary Ethnography 22 (1994): 488–517.

Hyde, C. “Feminist Social Movement Organizations Survive the New Right.” In Feminist Organization, ed. M. M. Ferree and P. Y. Martin. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1995, pp. 306–322.

James, E. “The Nonprofit Sector in Comparative Perspective.' In The Nonprofit Sector, ed. W. W. Powell. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1987, pp. 397–415.

Jenkins, C. and Klandermans, B. The Politics of Social Protest. Minneapolis: Minnesota University Press, 1995.

Jurgen, G. and Rucht, D. “Mesomobilization: Organizing and Framing Two Protest Campaigns.” American Journal of Sociology 98 (1992): 555–596.

Katzenstein, M. F. and Mueller, C. M. The Women's Movements of the United States and Western Europe. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1987.

Kendrick, R. “Meaning and Participation: Perspectives of Peace Movement Participants.” Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change 13 (1991): 91–111.

Kodama, K. and Vesa, U. Towards a Comparative Analysis of Peace Movements. Hants: Dartmouth, 1990.

Kriesberg, L. International Conflict Resolution. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1992.

Kriesi, H. “The Organizational Structure of New Social Movements in a Political Context.” In Comparative Perspectives on Social Movements, ed. D. McAdam, J. McCarthy, and M. Zald. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1996, pp. 152–184.

Lipset, S. “The Social Requisites of Democracy Revisited.” American Sociological Review 59 (1994): 1–22.

Lipsky, M. and Smith, S. R. “Nonprofit Organizations, Government and the Welfare State.” Political Science Quarterly 104 (1989): 625–648.

Lofland, J. Social Movement Organizations: Guide to Research on Insurgent Realities. New York: Aldine de Gruyter, 1996.

Lofland, J. and Marullo, S. Peace Movements in the 1980's: Social Science Perspectives. New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, 1990.

Lund, M. Preventing Violent Conflicts. Washington, D.C.: United States Institute of Peace, 1996.

Macdonald, M. “The Dominant Communities and the Costs of Legitimacy.” In The Elusive Search for Peace, ed. H. Giliomee and J. Gagiano. South Africa: Oxford University Press, 1989.

Maguire, D. “When the Streets Begin to Empty: The Demobilization of the British Peace Movement after 1983.” West European Politics 15 (1994): 75–94.

Marwell, G. and Oliver, P. “Collective Action Theory and Social Movement Research.” Research in Social Movements, Conflict and Change 7 (1984): 1–27.

(p.271) Mattausch, J. “The Peace Movement: Some Answers Concerning its Social Nature and Structure.” International Sociology 4 (1989): 217–225.

McAdam, D. “Tactical Innovation and the Pace of Insurgency.” American Sociological Review 48 (1983): 735–754.

McAdam, D. “Conceptual Origins, Current Problems, Future Directions.” In Comparative Perspectives on Social Movements, ed. D. McAdam, J. McCarthy, and M. Zald. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1996, pp. 23–40.

McAdam, D., McCarthy, J. and Zald, M. “Introduction: Opportunities, Mobilizing Structures, and Framing Processes—Toward a Synthetic, Comparative Perspective on Social Movements.” In Comparative Perspectives on Social Movements, ed. D. McAdam, J. McCarthy, and M. Zald. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1996, pp. 1–20.

McAdam, D., McCarthy, J. D. and Zald, M. eds. Comparative Perspectives on Social Movements. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1996.

McCarthy, J. D. and Zald, M. The Trend of Social Movements in America: Professionalization and Resource Mobilization. Morristown, N.J.: General Learning Press, 1973.

McCarthy, K., Hodgkinson, V., Sumariwalla, R. and Associates. The Nonprofit Sector in the Global Community. San Francisco: Jossey‐Bass, 1992.

Mertig, A. G. and Dunlap, R. E. “Public Approval of Environmental Protection and Other New Social Movement Goals in Western Europe and the United States.” International Journal of Public Opinion Research 7 (1995): 145–156.

Minkoff, D. Organizing for Equality: The Evolution of Women's and Racial‐Ethnic Organizations in America 1955–1985. New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, 1995.

Oskamp, S., Bodin, J. and Edwards, T. “Background Experiences and Attitudes of Peace Activists.” Journal of Psychology 126 (1992): 49–61.

Ostrander, S. Money for Change. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1995.

Powell, W. ed., The Nonprofit Sector. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1987.

Ragin, C. The Comparative Method. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1987.

Rapaport, A. Peace: An Idea Whose Time Has Come. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1992.

Rothschild‐Whitt, J. “The Collectivist Organization: An Alternative to Rational Bureaucratic Models.” American Sociological Review 44 (1979): 509–527.

Sarup, G. “A Reference Group Theory of Social Movements and Identity.” Social Science 50 (1975): 219–226.

Schmitt, R. “Organizational Interlocks between New Social Movements and Traditional Elites: The Case of the West German Peace Movement.” European Journal of Political Research 17 (1989): 583–598.

Seibel, W. “Government/Third Sector Relations in a Comparative Perspective: The Cases of France and West Germany.” Voluntas 5 (1990): 42–61.

Snow, D. and Benford, R. “Ideology, Frame Resonance, and Participant Mobilization.” International Social Movement Research 1 (1988): 197–217.

Snow, D. and Benford, R. “Master Frames and Cycles of Protest.” In Frontiers in Social Movement Theory, ed. A. Morris and C. M. Mueller. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1992, pp. 133–155.

(p.272) Salamon, L. M. and Anheier, H. K. “Social Origins of Civil Society: Explaining the Nonprofit Sector Cross‐Nationally.” Voluntas 9 (1998): 213–248.

Sussman, G. and B. Steel. “Support for Protest Methods and Political Strategies among Peace Movement Activists: Comparing the US, Great Britain, and the Federal Republic of Germany.” Western Political Quarterly 44 (1991): 519–40.

Tilly, C. From Mobilization to Revolution. Reading, Pa.: Addison‐Wesley, 1978.

Van den Dungen, P. ed. West European Pacifism and the Strategy for Peace. New York: St. Martin's, 1985.

Weiss, T. “Nongovernmental Organizations and Internal Conflict.” In The International Dimensions of Internal Conflict, ed. M. Brown. Cambridge: MIT Press, 1996, pp. 435–460.

Zald, M. and Garner, R. A. “Social Movement Organizations: Growth, Decay, and Change.” In Social Movements in an Organizational Society, ed. M. Zald and J. McCarthy. New Brunswick, N.J.: Transaction Books, 1987, pp. 121–141.

Zald, M. and McCarthy, J. “Social Movement Industries: Competition and Conflict among SMOs.” In Social Movements in an Organizational Society, ed. M. Zald and J. McCarthy. New Brunswick, N.J.: Transaction Books, 1987, pp. 161–180.