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Working Hours and Job Sharing in the EU and USA
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Working Hours and Job Sharing in the EU and USA: Are Europeans Lazy? Or Americans Crazy?

Tito Boeri, Michael Burda, and Francis Kramarz

Abstract

In the last fifty years, the gap in labour productivity between Europe and the US has narrowed considerably with estimates in 2005 suggesting a EU-US labour productivity gap of about 5%. Yet, average per capita income in the EU is still about 30% lower than in the US. This persistent gap in income per capita can be almost entirely be explained by Europeans working less than Americans. Why do Europeans work so little compared to Americans? What do they do with their spare time outside work? Can they be induced to work more without reducing labour productivity? If so, how? And what is the effect ... More

Keywords: labour productivity gap, working hours, reward, per capita income, spare time, well-being

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2008 Print ISBN-13: 9780199231027
Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2008 DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199231027.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Tito Boeri, editor
Professor of Economics, Bocconi University, Milan
Author Webpage

Michael Burda, editor
Professor of Economics, Humboldt University Berlin
Author Webpage

Francis Kramarz, editor
Head of the Research Department at CREST-INSEE and Associate Professor at Ecole Polytechnique
Author Webpage

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Contents

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Part I The Distribution of Total Work in the EU and USA

Michael C. Burda, Daniel S. Hamermesh, and Philippe Weil

General Introduction

Michael C. Burda, Daniel S. Hamermesh, and Philippe Weil

1 Time Use and Work Timing Inside and Outside the Market

Michael C. Burda, Daniel S. Hamermesh, and Philippe Weil

2 Explaining the Data

Michael C. Burda, Daniel S. Hamermesh, and Philippe Weil

3 Home Production, Setup Costs, and Welfare

Michael C. Burda, Daniel S. Hamermesh, and Philippe Weil

General Conclusion

Michael C. Burda, Daniel S. Hamermesh, and Philippe Weil

Part II Labor Market Effects of Work‐Sharing Arrangements in Europe

Francis Kramarz, Pierre Cahuc, Bruno Crépon, Oskar Nordström Skans, Thorsten Schank, Gijsbert van Lomwel, and André Zylberberg

Introduction

Francis Kramarz, Pierre Cahuc, Bruno Crépon, Oskar Nordstörm Skans, Thorsten Schank, Gijsbert van Lomwel, and André Zylberberg

4 Reduction of Working Time and Employment

Francis Kramarz, Pierre Cahuc, Bruno Crépon, Oskar Nordstörm Skans, Thorsten Schank, Gijsbert van Lomwel, and André Zylberberg

5 Working Time Developments in Germany

Francis Kramarz, Pierre Cahuc, Bruno Crépon, Oskar Nordstörm Skans, Thorsten Schank, Gijsbert van Lomwel, and André Zylberberg

6 The Two French Work‐Sharing Experiments: Employment and Productivity Effects

Francis Kramarz, Pierre Cahuc, Bruno Crépon, Oskar Nordstörm Skans, Thorsten Schank, Gijsbert van Lomwel, and André Zylberberg

7 Unions, Working Hours, and Absence: Sweden

Francis Kramarz, Pierre Cahuc, Bruno Crépon, Oskar Nordstörm Skans, Thorsten Schank, Gijsbert van Lomwel, and André Zylberberg

8 Work‐Sharing, Part‐Time Employment, and Childcare

Francis Kramarz, Pierre Cahuc, Bruno Crépon, Oskar Nordstörm Skans, Thorsten Schank, Gijsbert van Lomwel, and André Zylberberg

9 General Conclusion

Francis Kramarz, Pierre Cahuc, Bruno Crépon, Oskar Nordstörm Skans, Thorsten Schank, Gijsbert van Lomwel, and André Zylberberg

End Matter