Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation

Emotional Development:: Recent Research Advances

Jacqueline Nadel and Darwin Muir

Abstract

From prenatal life onwards, our emotions play a central role in our development. Exactly how emotions shape our lives is less clear. We know that emotional impairments can have a disastrous effect on development. We know that emotions play a key role in adaptation. We know that traumatic emotional events can scar individuals. The processes through which these emotional changes occur are complex however, and have recently become the subject of considerable interest in the cognitive sciences. In this volume a group of scientists considers emotional development from fetal life onwards. The book i ... More

Keywords: emotions, emotional impairment, adaptation, cognitive science, primatology, robotics, psychopathology, prenatal development, emotional development

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2004 Print ISBN-13: 9780198528845
Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012 DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198528845.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Jacqueline Nadel, editor
Research Director, French National Centre of Scientific Research (CNRS), Hopital de la Salpetriere, Paris, France

Darwin Muir, editor
Department of Psychology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada

Contents

View:

Section I Psychobiological approaches and evolutionary perspectives

Neural bases of emotions and evolutionary perspectives

Ontogeny

Chapter 4 Maternal–fetal psychobiology: a very early look at emotional development

Amy Salisbury, Penelope Yanni, Linda Lagasse, and Barry Lester

Chapter 6 Emotions in early mimesis

Giannis Kugiumutzakis, Theano Kokkinaki, Maria Makrodimitraki, and Elena Vitalaki

New technology

Chapter 9 Emotion understanding: robots as tools and models

Lola Cañamero, and Philippe Gaussier

Section II Comparative approaches: typical and impaired emotional development

Chapter 13 Emotion sharing and emotion knowledge: typical and impaired development

Helene Tremblay, Philippe Brun, and Jacqueline Nadel