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Child Welfare Research$
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Duncan Lindsey and Aron Shlonsky

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780195304961

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195304961.001.0001

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ContentsFRONT MATTER

A Descriptive Study of Intimate Partner Violence and Child Maltreatment: Implications for Child Welfare Policy

Chapter:
(p.154) 9 A Descriptive Study of Intimate Partner Violence and Child Maltreatment: Implications for Child Welfare Policy
Source:
Child Welfare Research
Author(s):

Lynette M. Renner

Kristen Shook Slack

Lawrence M. Berger

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195304961.003.009

Using survey and administrative data, this chapter presents analyses of co-occurring intimate partner violence (IPV) and child maltreatment allegations in a sample of current and former welfare recipients (N = 1,011). Results show a co-occurrence rate of six percent within an approximate one-year time interval. In the subgroup of families with co-occurring IPV and child maltreatment allegations (n = 65), sixty-eight percent of investigated maltreatment reports involve the female IPV victim as a perpetrator. Findings also show that multiple forms of IPV and child maltreatment should be considered when assessing co-occurrence. Compared to families that experience one or neither form of family violence, families with both IPV and child maltreatment allegations have higher levels of parental depression and stress, greater use of harsh discipline, lower parental warmth, and poorer parental physical health. Results from this study are relevant to systems that serve families experiencing IPV and child maltreatment, and for interventions designed to improve family safety.

Keywords:   child maltreatment, intimate partner violence, co-occurring violence, child abuse, family violence

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