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A New SignificanceRe-Envisioning the History of the American West$

Clyde A. Milner

Print publication date: 1997

Print ISBN-13: 9780195100471

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195100471.001.0001

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(p.307) Contributors

(p.307) Contributors

Source:
A New Significance
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

The Editor

  • Clyde A. Milner II

    is the editor of the Western Historical Quarterly and a professor of history at Utah State University. He has written on a range of subjects, including the work of eastern Quakers among the Plains Indians and the role of memory in creating a western identity. He is the editor of Major Problems in the History of the American West and the coeditor, with Carol A. OʼConnor and Martha A. Sandweiss, of The Oxford History of the American West

The Authors

  • Allan G. Bogue

    is Frederick Jackson Turner Professor of History emeritus at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He has been president of the Organization of American Historians, the Agricultural History Society, the Economic History Association, and the Social Science History Association. He is the author of many books on American western and political history and has recently completed a biographical study of Frederick Jackson Turner.

  • Richard Maxwell Brown

    is Beekman Professor of Northwest and Pacific History emeritus at the University of Oregon. He was 1991–92 president of the Western History Association and a consultant to the National Commission on the Causes and Prevention of Violence in 1968–69. Among his publications are Strain of Violence: Historical Studies of American Violence and Vigilantism and No Duty to Retreat: Violence and Values in American History and Society.

  • Arnoldo De León

    is C. J. “Red” Davidson Professor of History at Angelo State University. His books include They Called Them Greasers, The Tejano Community, 1836–1900, and with Kenneth L. Stewart, Tejanos and the Numbers Game.

  • William Deverell

    is an associate professor of history in the Division of the Humanities and Social Sciences at the California Institute of Technology (p.308) and adjunct associate professor of history at the University of California, San Diego. He is the author of Railroad Crossing: California and the Railroad, 1850–1910 and coeditor of California Progressivism Revisited.

  • Dan Flores

    is A. B. Hammond Professor of Western History at the University of Montana. He has written extensively on the environmental history of the American West. His works include Caprock Canyonlands: Journeys into the Heart of the Southern Plains and Jefferson and Southwestern Exploration.

  • Deena J. González

    is an associate professor of history at Pomona College and the chair of Chicano Studies at the Claremont Colleges. Her publications include Refusing the Favor: The Spanish-Mexican Women of Santa Fe, 1820–1880 (forthcoming) and Dictionary of Latinas in the United States.

  • David G. Gutiérrez

    is an associate professor of history and the codirector of the Southwest History Project at the University of California, San Diego. He is the author of Walls and Mirrors: Mexican Americans, Mexican Immigrants, and the Politics of Ethnicity and the editor of Between Two Worlds: Mexican Immigrants in the United States.

  • Albert L. Hurtado

    is an associate professor of history at Arizona State University. The Organization of American Historians awarded him the Billington Prize for his book Indian Survival on the California Frontier (1988). He has published articles in Pacific Historical Review, Western Historical Quarterly, and other scholarly journals and is writing a biography of the borderlands historian Herbert Eugene Bolton.

  • Anne F. Hyde

    is an associate professor of history at Colorado College and is the author of An American Vision: Far Western Landscape and National Culture, 1820–1920.

  • Peter Iverson

    is a professor of history at Arizona State University. His books include The Navajo Nation, Carlos Montezuma, The Plains Indians of the Twentieth Century, The Navajos, and When Indians Became Cowboys.

  • Susan Lee Johnson

    is an assistant professor of history at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Her first book, on gender and race relations in the California Gold Rush, is forthcoming from W. W. Norton. Her essay published in the Western Historical Quarterly and reprinted in this collection received the Joan Jensen—Darlis Miller Award from the Coalition for Western Women's History and the Don D. Walker Award from the Western Literature Association.

  • David Rich Lewis

    is an associate professor of history at Utah State University and the associate editor of the Western Historical Quarterly. He is the author of Neither Wolf Nor Dog: American Indians, Environment, and Agrarian Change (p.309) He is now engaged in research and writing on Native American gambling in the twentieth century.

  • Patricia Nelson Limerick,

    a professor of history at the University of Colorado, Boulder, is the author of Desert Passage and The Legacy of Conquest: The Unbroken Past of the American West. She also edited, with Clyde A. Milner II and Charles E. Rankin, Trails: Toward a New Western History.

  • Sucheta Mazumdar

    is an assistant professor of history at Duke University. Her publications include Sugar and Society in China: Peasants, Technology, and the World Market (forthcoming). She also coedited Making Waves: Writings by and about Asian American Women and is the founder-editor of the South Asia Bulletin: Comparative Studies of South Asia, Middle East, and Africa.

  • Susan Rhoades Neel

    Neel is an associate professor of history in the Department of History and Philosophy at Montana State University. Her first book is on Echo Park and the rise of modern environmentalism. She is presently researching and writing on tourism and the commodification of nature in Yellowstone National Park.

  • Gail M. Nomura

    is director of the Asian/Pacific American Studies Program and a faculty member of the Program in American Culture and Residential College at the University of Michigan. She has coedited two anthologies— Frontiers of Asian American Studies and Bearing Dreams, Shaping Visions: Asian Pacific American Perspectives—and has published numerous chapters and articles on the history of Asian Americans.

  • Gary Y. Okihiro

    is the director of Cornell University's Asian American Studies Program and a professor of history. He is the author of Margins and Mainstreams: Asians in American History and Culture and Cane Fires: The Anti-Japanese Movement in Hawaii, 1865–1945.

  • Robert W. Righter

    is a professor of history at the University of Texas at EI Paso. Included among his books are Crucible for Conservation: The Creation of Grand Teton National Park and The Making of a Town: Wright, Wyoming. He has published articles in many journals, including “National Monuments to National Parks: The Use of the Antiquities Act of 1906,” in the Western Historical Quarterly.

  • Vicki L. Ruiz

    is a professor of women's studies and history at Arizona State University. She is the author of Cannery Women, Cannery Lives and the coeditor of Western Women: Their Land, Their Lives, Women on the U.S.-Mexico Border, and Unequal Sisters: A Multicultural Reader in U.S. Women's History. Forthcoming is From Out of the Shadows: A History of Mexican Women in the United States, 1900–1990.

  • (p.310) Martha A. Sandweiss

    is director of the Mead Art Museum and an associate professor of American Studies at Amherst College. A former curator of photographs at the Amon Carter Museum, she has written widely on western photography and art. She is the author of Laura Gilpin: An Enduring Grace and the editor of Photography in Nineteenth-Century America. With Clyde A. Milner II and Carol A. OʼConnor, she coedited The Oxford History of the American West, which received the Western Heritage Award of the National Cowboy Hall of Fame.

  • Quintard Taylor

    is a professor of history at the University of Oregon. He is the author of The Forging of a Black Community: Seattle's Central District from 1870 through the Civil Rights Era and In Search of the Racial Frontier: African Americans in the American West, 1528–1990 (forthcoming).

  • Barre Toelken

    is a professor of English and history and is the director of the Folklore Program and the American Studies Graduate Program at Utah State University. A former president of the American Folklore Society, he is the author of The Dynamics of Folklore and of-Morning Dew and Roses. He also has published more than fifty articles on folklore, folksong, Native American and ethnic traditions, and related topics.

  • Elliott West

    is a professor of history at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville. A specialist in the social history of the West and the frontier, he is the author of Growing Up with the Country: Childhood on the Far-Western Frontier and The Saloon on the Rocky Mountain Mining Frontier.